5 vegetables that become more useful after cooking

The main rule of healthy nutrition is to consume as many as possible:

  • Fresh vegetables
  • Protein
  • Healthy fats

While everything is more or less clear with the second point (poultry, legumes and dairy products) and the third point (fatty fish, avocado, vegetable oils), the first one is not as obvious, as it seems.

Most people believe that vegetables are good in any form. Did you know that some vegetables become much more useful after they were cooked? If not, then this article is especially for you.

“Folk wisdom says that processed (that is, cooked) vegetables contain less nutrients than fresh ones do. But this is not always true,”

says Consumer Reports nutritionist Amy Keating.

“A number of nutrients in vegetables and fruits are blocked at the cell level, and high temperatures help to release them.”

Below, you will find five vegetables, which are better to cook before eating.

CARROT

Cooking process activates carotenoids, which, according to experiments in mice, can prevent cancer. A study held in 2008 and published in the Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry showed that the level of carotenoids is 14% higher in cooked carrots than that in fresh carrots.

Not the most attractive option? Then don’t forget about frying, which, according to the same study, increases the content of carotenoids by 13%.

CARROT

Tip:

To get the most benefit, cook whole carrots, postponing their slicing for a later time. This will allow you to keep as much nutrients as possible inside it, instead of “enriching” water with them.

SPINACH

Not the most popular for many people, yet extremely useful spinach is literally stuffed with nutrients (especially – calcium and iron). Keep in mind that you should obligatory cook it, because spinach also contains oxalic acid, which blocks the absorption of iron in our body, calcium and other useful elements.

Fortunately, the acid can be destroyed by heating. Studies show that spinach preserves its nutritional properties best, if it is immersed in boiling water for a minute and then into cold water to preserve its attractive appearance.

SPINACH

Tip:

Cook a lot of spinach at once, drain the water and store it in the freezer – this will make it easier to add the vegetable to the dishes, whether it is a vegetable stew, soup or omelet.

MUSHROOMS

Compared to 200 grams of fresh mushrooms, 200 grams of cooked ceps contain almost twice as much:

  • potassium (for strong muscles),
  • niacin (for the heart and vessels),
  • zinc (for the immunity),
  • magnesium (for the bone tissue).

MUSHROOMS

At least, this fact is responsibly declared by the US Department of Agriculture, based on the data of their own research. In addition, keep in mind that even edible mushrooms can contain a small amount of toxins that are easily destroyed by roasting.

Tip:

Cook the mushrooms with garlic and thyme sprigs to reveal the taste, and avoid adding too much oil, since the mushrooms act like a sponge, instantly absorbing everything that you pour into the frying pan.And, of course, do not forget about one of the healthiest ways to cook mushrooms – using a microwave.

ASPARAGUS

The study, published by the International Journal of Food Science & Technology, showed that cooking asparagus increases the level of six nutrients, including antioxidants with anti-cancer properties, immediately by 16%.

Another study, already in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, found out that cooking asparagus doubles the content of two types of phenolic acid, which scientists believe to reduce the risk of cancer.

ASPARAGUS

Tip:

Immerse the asparagus in boiling water and cook until it is bright green, and serve – sprinkling with lemon juice and a small amount of olive oil (fats will help antioxidants assimilate better).

TOMATOES

When it comes to the tomatoes, it doesn’t matter which cooking method you choose:

  • frying,
  • boiling,
  • baking.

TOMATOES

Exposure to heat increases the content of lycopene. We remind you that this carotenoid pigment is associated with lower rates of cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

According to a study of 2002, heating tomatoes for 30 minutes at a temperature of about 87 degrees increases the amount of lycopene in them by 35%.

Even though exposure to heat reduces the content of vitamin C in vegetables, the same study showed that its activity is increased by 62%. Not bad, huh?

Tip:

If you want to make a classic vegetable salad, do not be lazy and keep the tomatoes in a preheated oven a couple of minutes.It does not affect the taste, yet it will significantly increase the benefits and flavor of the dish (let the cucumbers be responsible for the crunch).